Best Phone Under Rs. 20,000? These are the Best Mobiles Under Rs. 20,000

Best Phone Under Rs. 20,000? These are the Best Mobiles Under Rs. 20,000

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Huawei Honor 8 is a great pick under Rs. 20,000
  • If size isn’t an issue, consider the Xiaomi Mi Max 2
  • The Samsung Galaxy On Max delivers an excellent camera on a budget

The top selling category of smartphones is under Rs. 10,000, but if you’ve got a bigger budget, you can end up with some pretty amazing phones. Our list covers the seven best phones you can get for under Rs. 20,000, with as few compromises as possible. As usual, the list is made up of top phones that we’ve reviewed ourselves. We do look around the Web to see what others – including actual users – are saying, but our detailed testing process makes it possible to directly compare phones more accurately and pick what we believe are the best phones.

If you are on a tighter budget, you should also check out our list of best mobiles under Rs. 10,000 and best phones under Rs. 15,000.

Here are our top picks for best phone under Rs. 20,000 in no particular order.

Mobile under Rs. 20,000 Gadgets 360 rating
Honor 8 9/10
Xiaomi Mi Max 2 8/10
Samsung Galaxy On Max 8/10
Motorola Moto G5 Plus 8/10

1. Honor 8
Coming in at just under the Rs. 20,000 cutoff, the Honor 8 is the top rated phone on this list. It is a single-SIM phone however, with could be a deal-breaker for some. Beyond that, it’s a strong contender for your money at this budget, as we noted in our review of the phone.

There’s a 5.2-inch display running at full-HD resolution, backed up by a 1.8GHz octa-core processor and 4GB of RAM, along with 32GB of storage. The phone has a 12-megapixel camera on the rear, and 8-megapixels on the front. The battery is 3000mAh.

Huawei Honor 8

Huawei Honor 8

Rs.19,500
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Excellent display
  • Striking aesthetics
  • Powerful performance
  • Very good cameras
  • Good software features
  • Bad
  • No FM radio
  • Single SIM functionality
BUY AT
  • Huawei Honor 8 (Sunrise Gold, 32GB)
    Rs.19,500
  • Huawei Honor 8 (Sakura Pink, 32GB, 4GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs.19,990
  • Huawei Honor 8 (Blue, 32GB)
    Rs.27,999

2. Xiaomi Mi Max 2
The Xiaomi Mi Max 2 has been described as a battery pack with a phone attached, but it’s actually a pretty sleek and good looking phone, despite the enormous 6.44-inch display. As we note in our review, the camera is a little disappointing, but its battery life is predictably great, and has a good display and performance, making it a nice choice for media consumption, and one of the picks for the best phone under Rs. 20,000.

The phone has a 2GHz octa-core processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 12-megapixel camera on the rear, along with a 5-megapixel front camera. There’s 64GB storage, and a whopping 5300mAh battery as well.

Xiaomi Mi Max 2

Xiaomi Mi Max 2

Rs.16,999
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Premium looks and solid build quality
  • Battery life is impressive
  • Overall performance is decent
  • Quick charging support
  • Bad
  • Too bulky for any pocket
  • Hybrid dual-SIM slot
  • Camera could have been better
BUY AT
  • Xiaomi Mi Max 2 (Black, 64GB, 4GB RAM) –
    Rs.16,999
  • Xiaomi Mi Max 2 (Black, 64GB, 4GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs.16,999
  • Xiaomi Mi Max 2 (Black, 64GB, 4GB RAM)
    Rs.16,999

3. Samsung Galaxy On Max
The newest phone on this list, the Samsung Galaxy On Max is a solid all-rounder with good design and a nice display. In our review, we pointed out its camera as a highlight – possibly the best camera phone under Rs. 20,000 – but the battery life is only okay.

The cameras on the front and rear both have 13-megapixel sensors, and the phone, which is powered by a 1.69GHz octa-core processor and 4GB RAM, has a 5.7-inch display with full-HD resolution. The 3300mAh battery sounds good on paper, but we found that the real world results could have been better.

Samsung Galaxy On Max

Samsung Galaxy On Max

  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Face recognition
  • Decent cameras
  • Dedicated SIM and microSD slots
  • Neat software enhancements
  • Bad
  • Slippery rear panel
  • No notification LED
  • Average battery life

4. Motorola G5 Plus
You can’t have a budget friendly list without a Motorola phone, and that’s true here as well. The Moto G5 Plus is a good all-rounder that doesn’t blow you away on many fronts, but won’t let you down either, thus finding a spot in our list of best mobiles under Rs. 20,000.

Packing a 2GHz octa-core processor, 4GB RAM, and 32GB of storage, the phone has a 5.2-inch display, running at full-HD resolution. There’s a 12-megapixel camera at the back, and a 5-megapixel front camera, backed up by a 3000mAh battery.

Motorola Moto G5 Plus

Motorola Moto G5 Plus

  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Decent build quality
  • Turbo charging support
  • Near-stock Android Nougat experience
  • Quick fingerprint sensor
  • Bad
  • Heating issues
  • No LED indicator
  • Loudspeaker not very good
  • Low-light camera performance could be better

Budget friendly options
If these picks don’t have your fancy, you can save some money with these three budget friendly options. The Lenovo Z2 Plus has seen its price drop a lot since launch, but it’s still a solid option. The camera is one area where the phone could certainly improve, but battery life and performance are both excellent.

The Redmi Note 4 is another well-priced phone with great features. In our review, the only black mark against it is the camera, so if you’re looking for a value for money phone with great battery life and design, do consider this one.

There’s also the Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime is a great all-rounder. In our review, one issue that came up with the low light camera performance, but it has a superb screen, great battery life, and good performance too.

Additional options
These phones make up our top picks for phones under Rs. 20,000. If you’re on a tighter budget, here’s a list of all the best phones under Rs. 15,000, and under Rs. 10,000. In the under-Rs. 20,000 category, the Huawei Honor 8 Lite and the Asus ZenFone 3 Max also both hold a lower overall rating, but do well in different areas, and are worth your consideration, and there’s also the Oppo F3 which is a worthy contender.

So, between all of these phones, which ones caught your eye? If you’re planning on buying one of these, or are using another phone under Rs. 20,000, share your thoughts and experiences with us and the other readers, via the comments below.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

LG Q6, Priced in India Under Rs. 20,000, to Launch on Thursday

LG Q6, Priced in India Under Rs. 20,000, to Launch on Thursday

HIGHLIGHTS

  • LG Q6 was unveiled last month with two other variants
  • The India variant will come with 3GB RAM, 32GB inbuilt storage
  • It will go on sale from August 10, via Amazon India

LG Q6, amongst the first Q-Series phones launched by the South Korean company last month, is coming to India this week. The company’s exclusive online retail partner Amazon is teasing the Thursday, August 10 launch and sales start date of the smartphone on its website, even detailing that the 3GB RAM + 32GB storage variant of the LG Q6 will be made available on the marketplace. More importantly, the e-commerce website has teased the LG Q6 price in India, saying it will launch at less than Rs. 20,000.

To recall, the Q-Series bring a lot of premium features seen in the flagship G-Series in a more affordable package, and the LG Q6 bears the FullVision display with a 18:9 aspect ratio. It also comes with a face unlock feature, apart from Knock Code. The LG Q6 variant launching in India also supports dual-SIM cards, and runs on Android 7.1.1 Nougat.

As we mentioned, the LG Q6 sports a 5.5-inch FullVision (1080×2160 pixels) IPS display, and is powered by a Snapdragon 435 octa-core SoC coupled with 3GB of RAM. It sports a 13-megapixel rear camera on and a 5-megapixel front camera. The 32GB of inbuilt storage can be expanded via the microSD card slot.

The LG Q6 offers 4G VoLTE, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.2, NFC< Micro-USB with OTG, and a 3.5mm audio jack. It measures 142.5×69.3×8.1mm, and weighs 149 grams. It is powered by a 3000mAh battery. Sensors on the phone include accelerometer, ambient light sensor, gyroscope, and proximity sensor.

To recall, the LG Q6 was launched alongside the LG Q6+ and the LG Q6a, both of which featured the exact same design but different RAM and inbuilt storage configurations. Colour options at launch included Astro Black, Platinum, Marine Blue, Terra Gold and Mystic White. The LG Q6 price in India is expected to be kept in the mid-range segment, however, the company has yet to detail pricing anywhere at the moment.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

LG Q6

LG Q6

Rs.14,990
Buy
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

5.50-inch

Processor

octa-core

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

1080×2160 pixels

RAM

3GB

OS

Android 7.1.1

Storage

32GB

Rear Camera

13-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3000mAh

BUY AT
  • LG Q6 (Black, 32GB) – 
    Rs.14,990

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Will real estate development management model take a hit under RERA?

Under the development management model, large realty firms step in as development managers for smaller developers and landowners, in return for a share of the revenue, share of profit or a management fee. Photo: Mint

Under the development management model, large realty firms step in as development managers for smaller developers and landowners, in return for a share of the revenue, share of profit or a management fee. Photo: Mint

Mumbai: Stringent partnership rule under the new real estate law is likely to disrupt the development management (DM) strategy, an asset light model followed by large developers like Tata Housing Development Co. Ltd and Godrej Properties Ltd to increase the pace of their growth and expand their brand.

Under the DM model, large realty firms step in as development managers for smaller developers and landowners, in return for a share of the revenue, share of profit or a management fee. Pioneered by branded builders like Tata Housing and Godrej Properties, this partnership model got a boost in the last two-three years due to the rising distressed projects in the real estate market.

While most states are in the process of notifying their guidelines as per the Real Estate (Regulations and Development) Act (RERA), the Maharashtra regulatory authority has specifically asked all partners involved in a project to be called co-promoters if revenues are shared between them. This move is likely to force developers to relook at the model because of the added regulatory risks, according to builders and consultants.

“There is going to be a lot more onerous responsibility on the DM developer which wasn’t the case earlier. This would slow down DM projects. Developers are not signing as quickly as earlier,” said Anuj Puri, chairman, ANAROCK Property Consultant.

He said due to the added legal implications, branded builders would be far cautious than in the past on entering such a partnership with local developers.

“Earlier if anything went wrong, the reputation of the brand would have taken a beating but legally they could walk away as they were only acting as a DM agent. Now they would be legally responsible under RERA because they are being termed as co-developers,” Puri said. However, the structuring of such an arrangement would change post RERA and roles between the partners would clearly be defined in the contract to avoid any legal problems in the future, he added.

Brotin Banerjee, managing director (MD) and chief executive officer (CEO) of Tata Housing, said the company would take fewer projects under this model in future because of the regulatory risks. “At least for the next six to 12 months, we have to be very careful. We are in a wait and watch period as other states are yet to come out. However, we are clear that in cities where they make us a co-promoter, we will not get into DM but rather for joint development or a joint venture with driving stake in it,” he said.

Until last year, the company was betting on the DM model to expand into micro-markets of large cities expecting about 25-30% of its future projects to come from such partnerships. At present, it has over two DM projects in Mumbai.

For Godrej Properties, the added clause of calling co-promoter under the Maharashtra RERA would not impact its development management business though it would be a major setback for fly-by-night operators which have relied on such partnerships to revive their stalled projects, said Mohit Malhotra, MD and CEO, Godrej Properties.

“Our first preferred model has always been profit sharing model even before RERA got implemented because of the inherent risk that exists in DM… While RERA has added legal liabilities to us as co-promoter, we have always been selective with whom we partner as our brand is attached to the project,” he said, adding that developers would now look at the risk part more substantially.

At present, the company has 12 ongoing and upcoming projects under the DM model, of which six are based out of Mumbai and the rest are located in Bengaluru and Noida.

Executives of other developers like Radius Developers and Wadhwa Group said development managers need to be more flexible and should have the capacity to become co-promoter or co-developer when entering into a DM agreement.

“The regulatory landscape has gone through a shift. We have to solve past issues associated with the project if there are any. So the overall risk has heightened and if you don’t comply to the regulation there are bigger implications,” said Ashish Shah, chief operating officer, Radius Developers.

[“Source-livemint”]

Businesses may face liquidity crunch under GST

Working capital problems of MSMEs will get accentuated as banks, currently reeling under bad loans, are reluctant to give credit

Working capital problems of MSMEs will get accentuated as banks, currently reeling under bad loans, are reluctant to give credit

With businesses required to remit taxes collected under the Goods and Services Tax (GST) regime every month, their working capital demand from the banking system is likely to go up.

In the pre-GST era, taxes were remitted at quarterly intervals. Now, the working capital cycle of businesses will change from a quarterly to a monthly cycle, say experts.

Liquidity of businesses could tighten as on the one hand they have to remit taxes collected on goods and services sold in the previous month, while on the other hand, trade credit, will continue to be 90 days or more in many cases.

Liquidity under pressure

Liquidity could also come under pressure as there may be delays in an enterprise getting the benefit of Input Tax Credit if, say, its supplier does not remit taxes on the sale of inputs in time. Input Tax Credit is a mechanism under GST to avoid the cascading impact of taxes. Under this, the credit of tax paid at every stage will be available as a set-off for payment of tax at every subsequent stage.

Considering that the working capital cycle will change from quarterly to monthly, YES Bank is making a ‘GST Ready Working Capital Management’ solution available to customers, said Sumit Gupta, Group President & National Head — Business & Rural Banking.

S Ravi, a Chartered Accountant, opined that under GST, working capital demand will go up mainly due to monthly (returns) compliance and payment of tax, which will marginally impact cash flows of businesses.

Added a senior public sector banker: “Earlier if the goods supplied were rejected by a customer and the goods as well as the invoices were returned, then no tax was payable on such transactions. Now, under GST, once the goods are supplied, irrespective of whether they are returned or not, you need to pay a tax even as the buyer may get the benefit of trade credit. However, in case the goods are returned later, you can also claim a refund.”

Funds getting blocked

The banker observed that under the GST regime, in a running business, the combined effect of monthly tax payments, receivables on account of a longer trade credit cycle, and possible delays in getting Input Tax Credit could see funds getting blocked.

Bhanwar Lal Chandak, independent economist, observed that working capital problems of micro, small and medium enterprises will get accentuated as banks, which are currently reeling under bad loans, are reluctant to give credit, while trade credit is already in the doldrums.

[“Source-thehindubusinessline”]

China’s JD sells out of OnePlus 3 units in under 10 minutes

While the new OnePlus 3 does not require an invitation to buy, actually getting your hands on one is still tricky. One of China’s best-known retailers, JD.com, has reported that it ran out of units in under 10 minutes.

The good news is that a new batch is arriving soon – tomorrow! The new OnePlus 3 units will go on sale at 10pm local time at CNY 2,500. It’s not clear how long they’ll last, though.

The official OnePlus store is sold out as well, expecting units next Tuesday at 10 am. The third retailer where the 3 is available, Suning, doesn’t seem to have any either.

PM Narendra Modi invites ideas for Under 17 Football World Cup

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi has invited ideas from the public as India gears up to host the Under 17 Football world cup next year.

The 17th edition of the Under 17 Football world cup will be held in six cities from September to October 2017.52 world cup matches will be held in the global competition.

No free ride for investing in India through quasi equity investments under India-Mauritius pact

Stating that private equity firms commonly use convertible instruments for greater flexibility on returns and control, tax experts called for a formal circular to clarify the position.

There will be no free ride for those wanting to invest in India throughquasi equity investments such as convertible debentures via Mauritius under the recently amended treaty between the two countries, officials said. Those holding such instruments would do well to convert them into shares before April 1, 2017, to enjoy the exemption on capital gains tax, or grandfathering, that’s available until then.

“The date of acquisition will be the date on which an entity or individual comes to own shares and not the date on which investment in the instrument was carried out,” said a finance ministry official. Tax experts said this interpretation will have an adverse impact on PE firms.

Stating that private equity firms commonly use convertible instruments for greater flexibility on returns and control, tax experts called for a formal circular to clarify the position.

Govt rejects suggestions to bring agricultural income under tax net

The central government on Thursday outright rejected suggestions from some opposition members to bring agriculture income under the tax net, saying this is not being considered at all.

Replying to the debate on the Finance Bill, 2016-17 in the Lok Sabha, Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley asserted that despite global recession, the Indian economy is doing well. He maintained that it can do much better, provided there is agood monsoon and the government is able to address the vexed issue of non-performing assets (NPAs) of banks.

“Vishwa ke tulna mein hum sabse aage haen (in comparison to the rest of the world, we are far ahead),” Jaitley said.

“After two years of drought, if the forecast of better monsoon rains this year holds good, it will improve agriculture,” he said.

The minister said a good monsoon will add to the rural economy and thus the economy – which had been expanding on strength of public investment, the highest foreign direct investment (FDI) and urban demand – can only grow faster.

He pointed out that despite the global recession and uncertainty prevailing on how long the crisis will remain, India still continues to maintain a high growth rate at 7.65 per cent in 2015-16 compared to 7.2 per cent in 2014-15.

On the suggestion about introducing tax on agricultural income, he said that, firstly, large farm-based income was rare and people using agriculture as a front to hide income from other sources need to be dealt with by the tax authorities.

But he said under the federal structure, the state governments have the power to impose such agricultural tax and counselled Biju Janata Dal floor leader B. Mahtab that it will be ill-advised for the Odisha government to do so.

During the debate on the Finance Bill on Wednesday, Mahtab had asked: “Does it make any sense providing support to the big farmers, not taxing the agriculture produce of the farmers is one thing but not taxing the companies who are earning thousands of crores of rupees?”

Even Trinamool Congress member Saugata Roy had said that rich farmers should be brought under the tax net to widen the tax base.

On the issue of one per cent excise duty on non-silver jewellery, the finance minister ruled out its rollback, saying the levy was not applicable on small traders and artisans. Only those jewellers with more than Rs 12 crore turnover will attract the duty, he said.

Jaitley conceded that bad loans are an issue and the NPAs of banks remain a matter of concern for his government.

“I would not like to go on a blame game on this. But, we cannot solve the problem of NPAs by hiding it,” Jaitley said, stressing that the government is taking steps to bring the banks out of the NPA mess.

He maintained that loans that have been lent without proper due diligence will be investigated, and said NPAs need to be reflected in the balance sheets and subsequently addressed through capitalisation.

He flayed the Congress party for supporting the United Front government’s Voluntary Disclosure Scheme (VDS) in the 1990s, saying it was “an ill-advised scheme” and was “discriminatory against honest tax payers”.

“I am surprised that Mr. Veerappa Moily (Congress) said this is a highly successful scheme,” he said referring to the VDS launched in the mid-nineties when P. Chidambaram served as the finance minister under prime ministers H.D. Deve Gowda and I.K. Gujral.

Jaitley also took a dig at the Congress, and said: “I have not been able to understand the politics of hatred for ‘suit’ but love for gold”.

This was in reaction to Congress opposing the levy of excise duty on gold and other jewellery.

“If the Congress had objections to the levy, it can begin by removing the 5 per cent VAT in Kerala where it rules,” he said.

Responding to criticism that government’s steps have often been against people-oriented schemes, Jaitley said: “In all the three budgets this government presented, we tried to ensure that small tax payers have more money in their hands.”

The Finance Bill now goes to the Rajya Sabha, which has to return it and only then the budgetary exercise for 2016-17 will be completed.

Boutique asset managers ‘pushed aside’ as ratings agencies under fire

ratings-agencies-spotlight-generic

A number of smaller asset management groups have told Investment Week of their frustration with ratings agencies, following a report by Fundscape and gbi2 criticising some ‘gatekeepers’ for ignoring lesser-known names.

0703-top-five-funds-lists

The Gatekeepers Report, published last week, found buy lists and rankings from fund ratings agencies may be misleading, as they do not always include vehicles based on their quality and longevity of returns, and tend to favour the big household names.

Graham Bentley, MD at consultancy gbi2, said: “The importance of research in fund selection is undeniable, but there are significant differences in the quality of the research processes we reviewed.

“There are plenty of funds that deserve to be on the lists, but there were also some that had less performance substance and more reputational and sales momentum.

“We were also surprised by the number of funds that were clearly strong candidates for inclusion, but were overlooked by some independent researchers.”

The fact that a group is not a household name should not have a bearing on whether an adviser invests in the fund, but unfortunately it does. It is not the fault of the ratings companies.

Fund flows

Representatives from a number of boutique asset managers have since told Investment Week they have experienced difficulties getting in front of ratings agencies due to their small size, but most are wary of openly criticising the current system as they do not want to aggravate key gatekeepers.

According to Bella Caridade-Ferreira, chief executive of investment research house Fundscape, gatekeepers (including those controlling direct-to-consumer buy lists, ratings agencies and off-platform lists) are estimated to control between 50% to 70%  of UK fund flows.

One sales representative at a boutique investment firm, said: “I believe ratings are an essential thing, but due to costs and the fact that agencies do seem to edge towards the larger names, we feel slightly pushed aside, which does cut us off from 75% of the market.

“On half the calls we make, fund buyers want to hear we have a rating from one of the big agencies.”

The average cost of a licence to display a fund rating on marketing material is approximately £5,000-£10,000 per annum per fund for each ratings agency (rising as high as £40,000 for a larger asset manager), although there is no initial cost involved in having a fund rated.

However, smaller groups argue that some agencies, especially the bigger ones, do not want to begin research on funds before they have a guarantee a firm will want to pay for the licence.

“When it comes to doing the research, we provide all our information, but it seems like they almost want a guarantee of payment beforehand,” the source told Investment Week.

In response, ratings agencies have denied they are biased against smaller firms, and say their analysts have “independent discretion over which funds to select for coverage”.

There are plenty of funds that deserve to be on the lists, but there were also some that had less performance substance and more reputational and sales momentum.

Lack of understanding

Another issue raised by boutique firms is many run specialist strategies, which can fall under the radar of some agencies. A source told Investment Week one particular ratings agency did not understand the strategy of one of its products, and did not rate the fund for that reason.

A source at another boutique firm agreed, saying: “[The process] involves big questionnaires, meetings, then things go quiet and they do not give a good reason why.

“One said to us ‘the investment objective is too woolly and we do not want to rate multiple funds in the same sector’, so they chose the larger one. You cannot get upset by it. I would rather have people who understand the fund investing in it.”

For newer firms, another problem is agencies want to see long-term track records, but on the flip side they tend to focus on three-year numbers, which can be a problem for private client funds in particular.

These firms have said they feel excluded because their products tend to focus on longer-term performance, and although many vehicles have weathered the storm of 2008, agencies often disregard this in their research.

Buy list concentration

However, many also acknowledge the issue of fund flow concentration cannot be blamed on ratings agencies alone.

One source believes the fault lies with the regulator for forcing advisers to do so much due diligence they have no time to research individual funds, so only buy those with a rating from one of the big agencies.

“They will have a filter on whether or not it is rated, so we will be discounted immediately without them even looking at our objective or performance,” he said.

“The industry has lost sight of taking responsibility for investing in things you understand; instead they are just picking off a buy list.”

Mark Thomas, MD at River & Mercantile, added: “I think the ratings firms do look across the board for the best managers but the reality is it is up to the team building the portfolios what goes in and they tend to go for the larger, well-known names.

“The fact that a group is not a household name should not have a bearing on whether an adviser invests in the fund, but unfortunately it does. It is not the fault of the ratings companies.”

On half the calls we make, fund buyers want to hear we have a rating from one of the big agencies.

Ratings agencies respond

financial expressOliver Clarke-Williams, portfolio manager at FE

We rate all funds available for sale in the UK with enough history, regardless of size. In terms of ratings, all funds are eligible, no fund is excluded and no group has to pay to be rated. This ensures that the ratings are whole of market and independent.

However, it would seem logical in instances where groups have to pay to be rated that large groups will be more prevalent as they have bigger marketing budgets and can therefore pay for more ratings.

hale-clive-2015Clive Hale, director at FundCalibre

We do not agree that ratings agencies are overlooking smaller companies, at least not in the case of FundCalibre. If you take a look at the houses whose funds we rate, you will see that around 50% are those with less than £5bn retail assets under management. About 20% have less than £3bn. We continue to get inquiries from even smaller groups and are currently evaluating a couple of funds from a house with less than £1bn.

victoria-hasler-indoorsVictoria Hasler, head of research at Square Mile

At Square Mile, the size of a company is of very little importance to us when recommending a fund. We do make sure that all funds have the requisite resources, including adequate levels of investment and support personnel, as well as systems, IT, compliance and anything that we feel they need to be able to run a fund.

The size of the company is not of huge importance in determining how often we meet them. Some small companies have large and relevant fund offerings, some large companies have only a few relevant funds.

ken-raynerKen Rayner, founding director at RSMR

We do get a few phone calls with smaller fund management groups and we try to be as sympathetic as possible to that. We have always taken a view that when it is good enough, it is good enough, hence why we have fund managers like Unicorn, Chelverton and Evenlode on our list.

However, some funds can capture the strongest of their performance in the early part of their life, so often it is a mistake not to wait until it is £500m in size before looking at it.

MorningstarA spokesperson for Morningstar

Our manager research covers the funds most relevant to investors. This means funds of significant investor interest or those that our analysts believe have investment merit. Our Manager Research Analysts have independent discretion over which funds to select for coverage; there is no minimum size requirement.

[Source:- Investmentweek]